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FEATURE PLAYER
Jerome Bettis
#36

Position: RB Height: 5' 11" Weight: 255 lbs
Bettis ranks fifth on the NFL's all-time rushing list with 13,294 yards. He is one of six players in the NFL with over 13,000 rushing yards.


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June 27, 2007

Before we start, let's define the term 'super exotic sports cars'. Sports cars, by definition are borderline racing cars; boasting powerful performance and sleek looks. Their prestige makes them expensive, and thus the domain of a select few. With reference to sports cars, the term “exotic” refers to vehicles produced in very limited numbers. This of course increases their exclusivity and by virtue of this, their value. Exotic sports cars will, in all likelihood, be built by smaller manufacturers or perhaps the super high-end vehicles will be created by some of the better-known car companies outside of the United States, as exclusive models.

Many exotic sports cars are the stuff of legend. The world’s fastest car, the McLaren F1, for instance is a well-known exotic. Although only around one hundred F1s were produced and the manufacturer is not a household name (outside of the Grand Prix circuits of course), the McLarens are coveted sports cars. All exotic sports cars are highly sought after and, as status symbols, are second to none in the sports car world.

But, assuming that you can afford it, is an exotic sports car for you?

It is easy to be seduced by the allure of owning an exotic sports car. Owning one can be very tempting. Amongst the purists, the cars themselves are often considered the pinnacle of design. Any enthusiast who has the means will tell you that when an opportunity to invest in an exotic sports car presents itself, resistance can be very difficult.

One should try and be objective about the proposition though world series betting odds.

Before making such a major commitment, there are three factors you should consider.

Exotic Sports Cars Are Very Expense
The cost of owning such a prestigious car, does not end when you part with the initial payment. Even if one can afford the initial asking price of an exotic (and not many can), one needs to be aware of the likely ongoing running expenses , which can be significant. The maintenance and repair of an exotic car is certain to be expensive compared to non-exotic vehicles and a buyer should attempt to discover what kind of costs he or she is likely to experience in order to keep the car in running order. There can be no cost cutting on parts for these high end vehicles.

Parts for prestige cars are likely to be in short supply, if they are available at all. The likelihood that the owners of exotic sports cars will need to have some parts custom made during their ownership of the vehicle is quite high. And the cost will be significant. This is especially true of older exotics, many of which will have been orphaned when their original manufacturer stopped making cars. Not only will this prove extremely expensive, one can also expect it to be time consuming as well. And, as time passes, the necessary investment will only become greater.

Your usual mechanic cannot be expected to be able to repair exotic sports cars. You will need specialised mechanics with specialised tools to be able to ensure that appropriate and professional repairs are carried out. Not only will such individuals be, in all probability much more expensive than your usual mechanics, you would be very fortunate if you found one in your town. You should expect to have to do a lot of traveling in order to find suitable mechanical help.

All too often a sports car buff will purchase an exotic, without though to the ongoing costs, and, as a consequence be completely unprepared to handle additional future expenses. A thorough planning of expected costs and the means to meet those costs would certainly be in order.

Reliability Of High End Vehicles
Even though an exotic sports car may represent the ultimate in performance, One cannot assume that it will also be reliable. This will hold particularly true for the older 'classic' exotic cars. As with any high performance machine, exotic sports cars can be quite delicate (temperamental) which will, in all probability, require that you, or someone close to you be regularly on hand to make the adjustments to ensure that the vehicle stays in operating order. Exotic sports cars are well known for the spectacular side of their performance when they running well. However, the other side of the coin is that they are notorious for being among the most temperamental of vehicles that one may encounter.

If you plan to run an exotic sports car on a regular basis, you should be prepared for the highs and los of motoring. The sublime feeling of driving a top car with top performance can often be forgotten if the same car stops and refuses to start many miles from any assistance.

The Drivability of Exotic Cars
Most owners of high performance cars will tell you that such vehicles take 'some getting used too'. Optimum performance comes at a price, and will depend very largely on the skill of the driver. So, if you are relatively inexperienced, then please do not expect to get the best out of your car straight away. This in itself could prove too frustrating for many potentials owners. One should also take into account the relative risk of driving a high performance cars whilst still inexperienced.

For those to whom the additional cost of time in learning to drive a prestige car optimally and safely is not an issue, an additional, problem arises in the adjustment of seats and pedals for example. Small things that are irrelevant in normal cars take on much greater significance when applied to exotic sports cars.

When considering the purchase of an exotic sports car, one must look past the romance and excitement of owning a legendary vehicle. There are real concerns and obstacles to be overcome before the full enjoyment and benefit of owning such a car can be achieved.


About the Author: The article was written by Charlie Cory, who is the owner of Autos Inclusive. Autos Inclusive provides up to date news on all aspects of automobiles and motoring in general. http://www.autos-inclusive.com/exotic_sports_cars.html



June 26, 2007

It was pure lust on wheels. Jaguar's voluptuous E-type had car enthusiasts' tongues hanging down to their knees when it was introduced. And to this day the car commands head-spinning attention whenever it makes the scene.

First conceived in 1956, the E-Type was originally intended as a replacement for the Coventry, England firm's mighty D-Type endurance racers. Jaguar quit racing shortly after the E-Type's development began, but work on the car continued nonetheless, culminating in a production roadgoing version introduced at the Geneva Motor Show in March, 1961 world series betting odds. Offered as a two-seat coupe or convertible, it was an immediate hit.

Among the car's revolutionary features was independent rear suspension, a first for Jaguar, at a time when almost all streetable sports cars still used a more primitive solid-axle setup. But the E-Type's most compelling claim at the time was its speed. The car's smooth aerodynamics and 265-hp 3.8-liter inline six allowed it a top speed of 150 mph -- strictly the domain of race cars and ultra-pricey exotics back then. Although not cheap, the E-Type offered such thrills for far less money than similar-performing machines.

To ensure the E-Type's continuing sales appeal, Jaguar gave the car a succession of changes over the years. The 3.8-liter six was replaced for 1965 by a 4.2-liter version that had more torque. The following year, a 2+2 bodystyle was introduced. In 1971, Jaguar launched the final iteration of the E-Type, powered by a 314-hp 5.3-liter V12. The last of the 72,507 E-Types left the plant in early 1975.

Today, experts invariably list the E-Type as one of the world's most beautiful cars. Combine that appealing design with the car's pleasing road manners and sporty smooth exhaust purr, and you've got one of the finest sensory delights known to man.


About the Author: David Bellm is a seasoned automotive writer and historian. His work has been featured in a wide variety of online and print publications. For more articles on vintage sports cars, along with drive-test articles on today’s hottest performance cars, go to http://www.autiv.com/